PRESS

the album's highlights to perfection, and the disc closes with the mystical, spiritual slice of lust and loneliness

Temple Beautiful

a witty, gritty style that simply goes unmatched

Chuck Prophet

Temple Beautiful

2012

Yep Roc

San Francisco singer/songwriter/producer Chuck Prophet makes a mighty follow-up to 2009's Let Freedom Ring! With Temple Beautiful, his 12th studio album. Well-known as a co-founder of Paisley Underground head honchos Green On Red, Prophet lives up to his last name with a witty, gritty style that simply goes unmatched. TB, named after a long-defunct punk rock club, is packed with Prophet's unmistakeable style, and features special guests such as Red Man, Dan White, Flamin' Groovies vocalist Roy Loney, and a passel of highly talented soul mates. TB kicks off with the driving, fiery rocker ""Play That Song Again,"- a number that causes the listener do just that. "Castro Halloween" weeps and bleeds out a memorable, rough ballad- all bells and whistles intact. " The title cut is a catchy hand-clapper with Chuck's trademark "shooby doo wahs" and a memorable tale of unrequited love. "Museum Of Broken Hearts" slows the pace and shares his deepest fantasies, "Willie Mays Is Up At Bat" recalls a personal tale of the past over slithering slide guitar, while "I Felt Like Jesus" is an urban toe-tapper of the highest order. "Who Shot John" recalls Johnny Cash- a musical journey through crime, hard times, and righteous rhythms. "Little Girl, Little Boy"is an upbeat duet with Chuck's partner Stephanie Finch, and slams out like a `50's jukebox standard- replete with bouncy piano, danceable decadence, and revved-up horns. "White Night, Big City" collects all of the album's highlights to perfection, and the disc closes with the mystical, spiritual slice of lust and loneliness that is "Emperor Norton In The Last Year Of His Life (1880)" which neatly ties the whole affair together; bow and all. A must-have for fans, and an effort that should be heard globally. Sublime.

Tom Hallett

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by Tom Hallett on February 20, 2012 COMMENTS • Filed under CD Reviews

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